Hibernating Economic Decline? Chapter in “Tourism and Crisis”

April 9th, 2013 | Posted by Lize-Marié van der Watt in Publication - (Comments Off on Hibernating Economic Decline? Chapter in “Tourism and Crisis”)

Tourism and Crisis is a new title in the series Routledge Critical Studies in Tourism, Business and Management, published in February 2013 and edited by Gustav Visser and Sanette Ferreira. Dieter Müller, Umeå university and the Mistra Arctic Futures project From Resource Hinterland to Global Pleasure Periphery? is among the writers, contributing with the chapter Hibernating Economic Decline? Tourism and Labour Market Change in Europe’s Northern Periphery.

Read more about the book here.

New issues in Polar Tourism

January 25th, 2013 | Posted by Lize-Marié van der Watt in Publication - (Comments Off on New issues in Polar Tourism)

Dieter Müller and Linda Lundmark from the project From Resource Hinterland to Global Pleasure Periphery? are among the editors of a new publication from Springer, New Issues in Polar Tourism. The book focuses on land-based tourism in the Arctic and Antarctic regions, combines theoretical contributions with new empirical data from hitherto seldom-covered sources and destinations and spans disciplines to discuss conservation, tourism, indigenous populations, resource extracting activities, science and international cooperation. The book origins from the International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN), and documents the outcomes of its 2010 conference, held at Sweden’s Abisko Scientific Research Station.

Book New Issues in Polar Tourism

The book discusses for instance:

  • Reasons for the rise in tourism traffic to the polar regions (including “last chance” tourism inspired by increased media coverage of climate change),
  • Easier access to remote areas due to the shortening ice-season,
  • The pursuit of tourism by destination areas seeking economic and employment opportunities,
  • Environmental politics and impacts of tourism,
  • Conceptual ideas of polar wilderness,
  • Practical political action,
  • Indigenous peoples, communities and tourism in polar areas,
  • How businesses operate in polar environment with respect to climate change,
  • How the tourism industry can both advance and threaten efforts to sustain delicate environments and communities.
  • A speculation on the nature of winter tourism in Sweden in the year 2040.

 

A concluding chapter draws together the findings of the book, which can be ordered here.

Field trip report from Nenets autonomous okrug, September 2012

November 26th, 2012 | Posted by Lize-Marié van der Watt in Publication - (Comments Off on Field trip report from Nenets autonomous okrug, September 2012)

Albina Pashkevich, from Dalarna University and the Mistra Arctic Futures project From resource hinterland to global pleasure periphery? went on another field trip to Nenets Autonomous okrug, Northwest Russia 8-18 September 2012.

Field trip to Nenets region, Russia.

The main purpose of the field work was to investigate existing tourist products and look at possibilities for development of nature-based tourism in the area.

Read the field report here

Poster presented at IPY conference in Montreal, April 2012

May 30th, 2012 | Posted by Lize-Marié van der Watt in Publication - (Comments Off on Poster presented at IPY conference in Montreal, April 2012)

Linda Lundmark, Umeå university, and Albina Pashkevich, Dalarna university, presented the poster “Experiences and processes regarding nature protection and nature tourism in the Arctic” at the International Polar Year (IPY) conference  in Montreal 22-26 April 2012. The theme of the conference was “From knowledge to action”. Both Lundmark and Pashkevich work in the Mistra Arctic Futures project From resource hinterland to global pleasure periphery?

Read the poster here

Report from Arctic Games: “Lofoten tourism futures; actors and strategies”

May 23rd, 2012 | Posted by Lize-Marié van der Watt in News | Publication - (Comments Off on Report from Arctic Games: “Lofoten tourism futures; actors and strategies”)

The future development of the Arctic can take many different paths: development by state-dominated sectors (e.g., military infrastructure, research stations etc); mega-conglomerates (e.g., mining towns or petroleum hubs); or organic clusters (e.g., small enterprises anchored in local communities). This study suggests that Lofoten’s current development strategy for tourism follows the latter approach, where many small actors in the northern communities of Lofoten work in cooperation. A new report is now released by the University of Nordland and the Arctic Games project, funded by the Mistra Arctic Futures in a Global Context programme.

Lofoten, Norway. Photo: Merete Kvamme Fabritius

The report, entitled Lofoten Tourism Futures; Actors and Strategies, is based on the findings of Research Fellow Merete Kvamme Fabritius and Professor Audun Sandberg (University of Nordland, Norway) and analyzes how natural preconditions, cultural heritage and changing consumer tastes within the global tourism industry can shape the strategies of actors on the local level.

Read more on the Arctic Games web page and download the report here.

The Lofoten tourism industry sells a unique outdoor asset. Its historic success can be attributed to a cooperative effort by local enterprises to profit from Lofoten’s unique environment as an attractive northern tourist destination. The foundation for the area’s attractiveness is multifaceted and combines the 1000+ year history of Lofoten fisheries and export of stockfish to the Mediterranean, a distinctive fishermen’s cultural heritage, local food traditions and a new-born global demand for active tourist experiences (e.g., excitement tourism). This combination of assets can be referred to as the Lofoten Tourism-Heritage-Food- and Excitement Cluster.

The Lofoten tourism clusters are changing and dynamic, yet they tend to be based on one of these foundations. Further, there is a strong interdependence between the local enterprises, which often rely on one another’s activities to ensure a profitable industry for all.

The report also explores possibilities for scaling-up some of the insights uncovered in the analysis of the Lofoten tourism sector to the greater Arctic scene. One of the key questions is whether such scaling would imply multilevel governance where local, regional and national governments play important roles, or whether this may instead lead to the development of constitutional choices by the Arctic Council that aim more specifically at benefiting peoples of the North. This research question will be explored in the course of the Arctic Games project in 2013.

Merete Kvamme Fabritius is a Research Fellow at the Nordland Research Institute. Her areas of research include the institutional preconditions for, and the development of, tourism. Audun Sandberg is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Nordland. His areas of research include resource governance, institutional analysis and coastal systems.

This study is part of the Arctic Games research project within the Mistra Arctic Futures in a Global Context research program, funded by the Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research (Mistra) and hosted by the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat. For more information about the programme, visit www.arcticfutures.se.

Book: Polar Tourism: A Tool for Regional Development

March 27th, 2012 | Posted by Lize-Marié van der Watt in News | Publication - (Comments Off on Book: Polar Tourism: A Tool for Regional Development)

The Mistra Arctic Futures project From Resource Hinterland to Global Pleasure Periphery? Assessing the Role of Tourism for Sustainable Development in Arctic Communities has recently contributed to the book Polar Tourism: A Tool for Regional Development. It is edited by Alain A. Grenier (UQAM) & Dieter K. Müller (Umeå University) and published by Presses de l’Université du Québec.

Rich in culture and scenery, Nunavik has identified tourism as one of the main and best suited avenues for economic development. But as in many other parts of the Arctic, before Nunavik can truly enjoy the benefits of a well established tourism “industry”, many challenges need to be met. The development of tourism in a new destination is not only challenging but it requires human efforts, political and economic will over a large amount of time without much guaranties as to what it will work or not.

It is in this context that in August 2008, the members of the newly created International Polar Tourism Research Network (IPTRN) came to Kangiqsujjuak, Nunavik, to discuss how tourism can play a role in regional development. Such a book does not claim to address all issues facing the polar destinations. It is nevertheless a base for reflection. Many of the new emerging regions of the circumpolar world, like Nunavik, are experimenting with new powers and responsibilities.

For scientists, this is an excellent time to assist with the experiences that have been well documented from other Northern, Arctic and polar regions. For tourism researchers, this book is meant to offer a range of perspectives on how challenges can be met and how solutions can be implemented for the benefit of local interests.

Polar Tourism: A Tool for Regional Development contains 9 chapters authored by researchers from North America and Europe. Among those is Dieter K. Müller, researcher within the MISTRA Arctic Futures program, who also co-edited this volume within the program’s project From Resource Hinterland to Global Pleasure Periphery? Assessing the Role of Tourism for Sustainable Development in Arctic Communities.

Read more about the book